Can a stop price be the same as a limit price?

The stop price and the limit price for a stop-limit order do not have to be the same price. For example, a sell stop limit order with a stop price of $3.00 may have a limit price of $2.50. Such an order would become an active limit order if market prices reach $3.00, however the order can only be executed at a price of $2.50 or better.

What is a stop limit?

A Stop-Limit eliminates the price risk associated with a stop order where the execution price cannot be guaranteed, but exposes the investor to the risk that the order may never fill even if the stop price is reached. The investor could "miss the market" altogether.

Can a stop-limit order prevent an order from executing at an unexpected price?

An investor can avoid the risk of a stop order executing at an unexpected price by placing a stop-limit order. A stop-limit order includes a limit price that requires the order to be executed at the limit price or better – but the limit price may prevent the order from being executed.

What happens if a stop price reaches $50?

Let's say you have a stop price of $50 on a sell stop limit order and your limit price is $45. If market conditions are appropriate and the price of a stock reaches $50 it would trigger a limit order that would only activate at the limit price of $45 or better.